Michael Crosby

What is containerd ?

We have done a few talks in the past on different features of containerd, how it was designed, and some of the problems that we have fixed along the way.  Containerd is used by Docker, Kubernetes CRI, and a few other projects but this is a post for people who may not know what containerd actually does within these platforms.  I would like to do more posts on the featureset and design of containerd in the future but for now, we will start with the basics. I think the container ecosystem can be confusing at times. Especially with the terminology that we use. Whats this? A runtime. And this? A runtime…  containerd as the name implies, not contain nerd as some would like to troll me with, is a container daemon.  It was originally built as an integration point for OCI Continue reading…

Patrick Chanezon

Docker Leads OCI Release of v1.0 Runtime and Image Format Specifications

Today marks an important milestone for the Open Container Initiative (OCI) with the release of the OCI v1.0 runtime and image specifications – a journey that Docker has been central in driving and navigating over the last two years. It has been our goal to provide low-level standards as building blocks for the community, customers and the broader industry. To understand the significance of this milestone, let’s take a look at the history of Docker’s growth and progress in developing industry-standard container technologies. The History of Docker Runtime and Image Donations to the OCI Docker’s image format and container runtime quickly emerged as the de facto standard following its release as an open source project in 2013. We recognized the importance of turning it over to a neutral governance body to fuel innovation and prevent fragmentation in the industry. Working Continue reading…

Stephen Walli

Demystifying the Open Container Initiative (OCI) Specifications

The Open Container Initiative (OCI) announced the completion of the first versions of the container runtime and image specifications this week. The OCI is an effort under the auspices of the Linux Foundation to develop specifications and standards to support container solutions. A lot of effort has gone into the building of these specifications over the past two years. With that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the myths that have arisen over the past two years. Myth: The OCI is a replacement for Docker Standards are important, but they are far from a complete production platform. Take for example, the World Wide Web. It  has evolved over the last 25 years and was built on core dependable standards like TCP/IP, HTTP and HTML. Using TCP/IP as an example, when enterprises coalesced around TCP/IP as a common protocol, Continue reading…

Patrick Chanezon

More details about containerd, Docker’s core container runtime component

Today we announced that Docker is extracting a key component of its container platform, a part of the engine plumbing–containerd a core container runtime–and commits to donating it to an open foundation. containerd is designed to be less coupled, and easier to integrate with other tools sets. And it is being written and designed to address the requirements of the major cloud providers and container orchestration systems. Because we know a lot of Docker fans want to know how the internals work, we thought we would share the current state of containerd and what we plan for version 1.0. Before that, it’s a good idea to look at what Docker has become over the last three and a half years. The Docker platform isn’t a container runtime. It is in fact a set of integrated tools that allow you to build Continue reading…

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Arnaud Porterie

Docker 1.11: The first runtime built on containerd and based on OCI technology

We are excited to introduce Docker Engine 1.11, our first release built on runC ™ and containerd ™. With this release, Docker is the first to ship a runtime based on OCI technology, demonstrating the progress the team has made since donating our industry-standard container format and runtime under the Linux Foundation in June of 2015. Over the last year, Docker has helped advance the work of the OCI to make it more readily available to more users. It started in December 2015, when we introduced containerd ™, a daemon to control runC. This was part of our effort to break out Docker into small reusable components. With this release, Docker Engine is now built on containerd, so everyone who is using Docker is now using OCI. We’re proud of the progress we’ve made on the OCI with the 40+ members to continue the work to standardize container Continue reading…

Patrick Chanezon

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation is getting started today

In July Docker became a Founding Member of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Today the CNCF gets started with a ratified open governance structure including a Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) to direct technical decisions, for which nominations are open.

Michael Crosby

Progress Report: Open Container Initiative

Last June, we launched the Open Container Initiative, under the auspices of the Linux Foundation. The OCI was designed to collaborate on an open, standard container format and runtime in order to preserve that portability and interoperability for users. We’re very happy with the progress OCI has made, and we wanted to share that with you.

Michael Crosby

Open Container Format Progress Report

Follow Up from Open Container Initiative (formerly Project) Announcement of 6/22 written by Michael Crosby, Chief Maintainer of Docker, Inc. Approximately one month ago, we announced the creation of the Open Container Initiative*, under the auspices of the Linux Foundation for the express purpose of defining common specifications around container format and runtime.  Docker donated both our base container format and runtime, runC, and we began working with maintainers of AppC to create a common set of specifications. I’m happy to share that there has been a lot of progress in the past month. After the first few weeks of work for the OCF specification and runC most of the unanswered questions have either been solved or progress is being made on the GitHub repositories.  We are sprinting to get the first draft out to the community by the end Continue reading…