John Willis

Why I Love Docker… and Why You’ll Love it Too

About Me John Willis joined docker from the recent Socketplane acquisition. John is one of the founding members of the core Devopsdays team and was an early executive of both Chef and Enstratius (sold to Dell).   A little history… In early February 2013, I received a tweet from Adrian Cole telling me that I should talk to this Dotcloud outfit. I typically don’t ignore Adrian (not a wise move), but this time, in all honesty, I ignored his tweet. At the time, the public PaaS market was a race to the bottom. Heroku was killing Engine Yard and I wasn’t really a fan of this space anyway. I felt PaaS’s were too opinionated for building infrastructure and a Public PaaS made it even worse. About two weeks went by and I received another ping from someone else telling me that I Continue reading…

Ben Golub

dotCloud, Inc. is Becoming Docker, Inc.

This morning, we officially announced that dotCloud, Inc. is changing its name to Docker, Inc. This change is more than just a new name or new website. Since releasing Docker in March, we have seen it become not just a rapidly growing open source project, but also the center of a vibrant ecosystem that is driving a significant change in how software is written, built, and deployed. While Docker, Inc. will continue to offer PaaS services under the dotCloud brand, we will be devoting the vast majority of our resources towards growing Docker and the Docker ecosystem, and have fundamentally re-oriented our business model towards Docker-related products and services. Read on for more information on the Docker ecosystem and our future business model. The Docker Ecosystem  

Ben Golub

Excited to be Joining the Great Teams at dotCloud & Docker as CEO

I am thrilled to be joining dotCloud as CEO and excited to be joining the talented, passionate and rapidly growing Docker community. I started following dotCloud in 2011, when the standard PaaS model was to offer a single stack that ran on a single provider’s infrastructure. I was impressed by dotCloud’s vision of a multi-language PaaS, which offered developers a wide variety of different stacks that worked well together. In the process, dotCloud built a great business around public PaaS. In the past two years, however, it has become clear that the industry has a set of opportunities that even the broadest-based public PaaS can’t address. Developers want to be able to build their applications using an unlimited set of stacks, and run those aps on any available hardware in any hardware environments. Operators both inside and outside of the Continue reading…