Solomon Hykes

Docker Platform and Moby Project add Kubernetes

Today we’re announcing that the Docker platform is integrating support for Kubernetes so that Docker customers and developers have the option to use both Kubernetes and Swarm to orchestrate container workloads. Register for beta access and check out the detailed blog posts to learn how we’re bringing Kubernetes to: Docker Enterprise Edition Docker Community Edition on the desktop with Docker for Mac and Windows The Moby Project Docker is a platform that sits between apps and infrastructure. By building apps on Docker, developers and IT operations get freedom and flexibility. That’s because Docker runs everywhere that enterprises deploy apps: on-prem (including on IBM mainframes, enterprise Linux and Windows) and in the cloud. Once an application is containerized, it’s easy to re-build, re-deploy and move around, or even run in hybrid setups that straddle on-prem and cloud infrastructure. The Docker platform Continue reading…

Solomon Hykes

Introducing Moby Project: a new open-source project to advance the software containerization movement

Since Docker democratized software containers four years ago, a whole ecosystem grew around containerization and in this compressed time period it has gone through two distinct phases of growth. In each of these two phases, the model for producing container systems evolved to adapt to the size and needs of the user community as well as the project and the growing contributor ecosystem. The Moby Project is a new open-source project to advance the software containerization movement and help the ecosystem take containers mainstream. It provides a library of components, a framework for assembling them into custom container-based systems and a place for all container enthusiasts to experiment and exchange ideas. Let’s review how we got where we are today. In 2013-2014 pioneers started to use containers and collaborate in a monolithic open source codebase, Docker and few other projects, Continue reading…

Solomon Hykes

Docker to donate containerd to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Today, Docker announced its intention to donate the containerd project to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Back in December 2016, Docker spun out its core container runtime functionality into a standalone component, incorporating it into a separate project called containerd, and announced we would be donating it to a neutral foundation early this year. Today we took a major step forward towards delivering on our commitment to the community by following the Cloud Native Computing Foundation process and presenting a proposal to the CNCF Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) for containerd to become a CNCF project. Given the consensus we have been building with the community, we are hopeful to get a positive affirmation from the TOC before CloudNativeCon/KubeCon later this month.   Over the past 4 years, the adoption of containers with Docker has triggered an unprecedented wave of innovation in our industry: Continue reading…

Solomon Hykes

containerd – a core container runtime project for the industry

Today Docker is spinning out its core container runtime functionality into a standalone component, incorporating it into a separate project called containerd, and will be donating it to a neutral foundation early next year. This is the latest chapter in a multi-year effort to break up the Docker platform into a more modular architecture of loosely coupled components. Over the past 3 years, as Docker adoption skyrocketed, it grew into a complete platform to build, ship and run distributed applications, covering many functional areas from infrastructure to orchestration, the core container runtime being just a piece of it. For millions of developers and IT pros, a complete platform is exactly what they need. But many platform builders and operators are looking for “boring infrastructure”: a basic component that provides the robust primitives for running containers on their system, bundled in Continue reading…

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Solomon Hykes

Docker acquires Infinit: a new data layer for distributed applications

The short version: Docker acquired a fantastic company called Infinit. Using their technology, we will provide secure distributed storage out of the box, making it much easier to deploy stateful services and legacy enterprise applications on Docker. This will be delivered in a very open and modular design, so operators can easily integrate their existing storage systems, tune advanced settings, or simply disable the feature altogether. Oh, and we’re going to open-source the whole thing. The slightly longer version: At Docker we believe that tools should adapt to the people using them, not the other way around. So we spend a lot of time searching for the most exciting and powerful software technology out there, then integrating it into simple and powerful tools. That is how we discovered a small team of distributed systems engineers based out of Paris, who Continue reading…

Solomon Hykes

Why I am excited to join the Cloud Native Computing Foundation Technical Oversight Board

Docker’s mission is to build tools of mass innovation. To achieve this goal, we collaborate with the best developers in the world, working with the open source projects and organizations tackling the various aspects of containerization: the Docker open source projects with more than 2,000 contributors, the Apache Software Foundation with Apache Aurora, the Linux Foundation with the MirageOS, the Open Container Initiative (OCI) collaborative projects and the Cloud Foundry foundation. It is through these collaborations that we have been able to democratize complex technologies like OS containers and orchestrators such as Docker Swarm to make them accessible to organizations of all sizes.

Solomon Hykes

The Dawn of the Orchestration-for-All Era: Docker welcomes the creators of the Aurora project

Behind every tech giant is a treasure of innovative technology kept under wraps to preserve a strategic advantage. At Docker, we believe our job is to democratize these technologies by integrating them in tools that are easy to use and help people create new things. We did this for Linux containers, to help make applications more portable. We are also doing it with hypervisors and unikernels with the help of the Unikernel Systems team. Today we are proud to take a new step in this direction by acquiring Conductant, Inc.

Solomon Hykes

Introducing runC: a lightweight universal container runtime

Spinning Out Docker’s Plumbing: Part 1: Introducing runC On Infrastructure Plumbing To build a platform like Docker you need a lot of infrastructure plumbing; in fact over the past two years even though our code base has grown to tens of thousands of lines of code; roughly 50% of it is plumbing! Infrastructure plumbing is made of small software tools which perform basic fundamental tasks in the most reliable and simple way possible. It is invisible and under-appreciated especially given that plumbing is what holds the world’s Internet infrastructure together. To build Docker we have re-used large quantities of plumbing: Linux, Go, lxc, aufs, lvm, iptables, virtualbox, vxlan, mesos, etcd, consul, systemd… the list goes on. Docker wouldn’t be possible without the thousands of people who contributed to create this plumbing.When plumbing was not available or not sufficient, with the help Continue reading…