Building serverless apps with Docker

Every now and then, there are waves of technology that threaten to make the previous generation of technology obsolete.  There has been a lot of talk about a technique called “serverless” for writing apps. The idea is to deploy your application as a series of functions, which are called on-demand when they need to be run. You don’t need to worry about managing servers, and these functions scale as much as you need, because they are called on-demand and run on a cluster. But serverless doesn’t mean there is no Docker – in fact, Docker is serverless. You can use Docker to containerize these functions, then run them on-demand on a Swarm. Serverless is a technique for building distributed apps and Docker is the perfect platform for building them on. From servers to serverless So how might we write applications like Continue reading…

Announcing Docker 1.9: Production-ready Swarm and Multi-host Networking

Today we’re releasing Docker 1.9 – and it’s a big one. Docker Swarm and multi-host networking are production-ready, Docker Engine has a new volume management system, and Docker Compose has much better support for multiple environments. These in combination establish the foundation for scaling your distributed apps in production. Containerization is changing how you build infrastructure, and you need to use the right tools for the job. Docker Swarm turns your infrastructure into a single pool of resources for running your distributed apps, but all of the containers that are part of those apps need managing somehow. And they all probably need to talk to each other. And some of them probably need to store data somewhere. In a world where a container could be running on any host in your infrastructure, this is a difficult thing to manage.

Announcing Docker 1.8: Content Trust, Toolbox, and Updates to Registry and Orchestration

We’re thrilled to announce Docker 1.8 with support for image signing, a new installer, as well as incremental improvements to Engine, Compose, Swarm, Machine and Registry. You’ve been telling us that you want Docker to be more extensible and composed of smaller, standalone components. We hear you loud and clear. In June, we announced our intention to release runC as a separate piece of plumbing. With this release we’re taking another step towards that goal. The system powering image signing has been implemented as a separate piece of plumbing called Notary, and volume plugins, an experimental feature in 1.7, has now been promoted to the stable release. Across the board we’ve been making the usual quality improvements – something we know is important to all of you running Docker in production.

Announcing Docker 1.7: Multi-host networking, plugins and orchestration updates

We’re pleased to announce huge updates to Engine, Compose, Swarm and Machine, as well as an preview of new networking and plugin systems. We’ve been working really hard with the community to improve the quality of our projects, and this release includes a bunch of things to help with that. As part of the new networking and plugins systems in Engine, the networking and volumes systems have been completely rewritten. Also, Swarm and Compose have taken some big strides towards stability and production readiness. In this release of Engine, we’re also trying something new. The networking and plugin features are being released in a new experimental release of Docker, which allows you to try out features early and allows us to get feedback on them before we lock down the user interface and APIs. Check out this blog post to Continue reading…

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Announcing Compose 1.3, Swarm 0.3 and Machine 0.3

As with the last update to Compose, Swarm and Machine, we’re releasing versions alongside the new version of Engine at DockerCon 2015. In all three projects we’ve made some big steps towards production readiness, stability, and new integrations such as Mesos support in Swarm.

Faster and Better Image Distribution with Registry 2.0 and Engine 1.6

There has been incredible growth in the usage of Docker Hub: we have now served over 300 million pulls to developers around the world, and will soon be serving 100 million per month. The current generation of the Registry has done a good job so far, but we know we need a better foundation to support this growth and keep your image pulls running fast and reliably. We’re pleased to announce a huge update to how images are distributed, which will make pulling images dramatically faster and more reliable. It’s the foundation that will support image distribution in years to come.  Docker Engine 1.6, the Docker Hub and the self-hosted Registry now support a new API which has been completely redesigned with this type of performance and scale in mind. It features: Faster image pulls: Downloading images with lots of Continue reading…

Orchestrating Docker with Machine, Swarm and Compose

Back in December, we announced our new tools for orchestrating distributed apps: Machine, Swarm, and Compose. Today the first versions of these tools are available to download. They’re not ready for production yet, but we’d really like for you to try them out and tell us what you think. Machine takes you from “zero-to-Docker” with a single command. It lets you easily deploy Docker Engines on your computer, on cloud providers, and in your own data center. Read more and download on Machine’s blog post. Swarm is native clustering for Docker containers. It pools together several Docker Engines into a single, virtual host. Point a Docker client or third party tool (e.g., Compose, Dokku, Shipyard, Jenkins, the Docker client, etc.) at Swarm and it will transparently scale to multiple hosts. A beta version of Swarm is now available, and we’re Continue reading…

DockerCon EU: Introducing Docker Machine

At DockerCon EU we introduced Docker Machine, a way to get from zero to Docker. It creates Docker hosts on local hypervisors and cloud providers. Take a look at the demo in the video to get an idea for how it works, then head over to Docker Machine’s GitHub repository to try out a beta.