Jenny Burcio

5 Minutes with the Docker Captains

Docker Captain is a distinction that Docker awards select members of the community that are both experts in their field and are passionate about sharing their Docker knowledge with others.

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This week we are highlighting 3 of our outstanding Captains who are making September one filled with Docker learnings and events. Read on to learn more about how they got started, what they love most about Docker, and why Docker.

Alex Ellis

Alex is a Principal Application Developer with expertise in the full Microsoft .NET stack, Node.js and Ruby. He enjoys making robots and IoT-connected projects with Linux and the Raspberry PI microcomputer. He is a writer for Linux User and Developer magazine and also produces tutorials on Docker, coding and IoT for his tech blog at alexellis.io.

As a Docker Captain, how do you share that learning with the community?

I started out by sharing tutorials and code on my blog alexellis.io and on Github. More recently I’ve attended local meet-up groups, conferences and tech events to speak and tell a story about Docker and cool hacks. I joined Twitter in March and it’s definitely a must-have for reaching people.

Why do you like Docker?

Docker makes the complex seem simple and forces you to automate your workflow. I have a background in software engineering and automation is everything for delivering reliable, repeatable and testable systems.

What’s a common tech question you’re asked and the high-level explanation?

The questions vary and often surprise me – I like to be able to connect people to the right Captains or Docker folks. Opening an issue about a technical problem on Github is really valuable for the community and the Docker project. Please give feedback.

What’s your favorite thing about the Docker community?

The community is vibrant and full of life – people are working on solutions for problems that you may have and are generous with their knowledge.

Who are you when you’re not online?

I love film photography – everything from buying vintage cameras, to developing and printing my own images. I balance my time at the screen with road cycling – cruising down country lanes in the countryside or spending just time away from the screen in the great outdoors.

Marcos Lilljedahl

Marcos Lilljedahl is an OS evangelist and Golang lover with a strong background in distributed systems and app architecture. Marcos is currently working at Matica, a Machine Learning startup that brings latest in research to industry. Mantica runs Machine learning apps in a fully dockerized environment mainly using compose / machine and engine.

How has Docker impacted what you do on a daily basis?

Although I run pretty much everything in containers (even games like Counter Strike / Quake3 / etc), the biggest benefit comes from the fact that it really has helped to reduce friction when working with different teams and platforms. It’s a fundamental tool for everyone to speak the same “app” language and then translate that directly into production.

As a Docker Captain, how do you share that learning with the community?

I’m not the “blog post” kind of person, I usually like to deep dive into code and understand the core principles about Docker. I usually contribute by helping people resolve GitHub issues or by responding on the Slack community channel when there are specific questions or unexpected issues. Also, whenever I find some time, I like to hack on stuff like our two hackathon winner projects CMT and Whaleprint.

Why do you like Docker?

What I like the most is its fundamental purpose (help people with great ideas to make things possible) and the community behind it.

Who are you when you’re not online?

I like to do all kind of sports like sailing, swimming, playing soccer, running, snowboarding, roller hockey and crossfit. I also enjoy spending weekends with my girlfriend and family cooking asado.

If you could meet anyone in the world dead or alive who would it be and why?

I would have loved to meet young Steve Jobs. I believe he transmitted the energy to make anyone do the impossible.

Sreenivas Makam

Sreenivas Makam is currently working as a senior engineering manager at Cisco Systems, Bangalore. His interests include SDN, NFV, Network Automation, DevOps, and cloud technologies, and he likes to try out and follow open source projects in these areas. His blog can be found at sreeninet.wordpress.com and his hacky code at github.com/smakam. Sreenivas wrote a book on Mastering CoreOS, which was published in February 2016. He has done the technical reviewing for Mastering Ansible book, Packt Publishing, Ansible Networking Report, O’Reilly Publisher and Network programmability and Automation book, O’Reilly Publisher. He has given presentations at Docker and other meetups in Bangalore.

How has Docker impacted what you do on a daily basis?

I come from a networking background and used to approach problems from an infrastructure point of view. Docker has given me the insight to approach problems from a developer or an operator perspective.

As a Docker Captain, how do you share that learning with the community?

I enjoy sharing my learning and knowledge through my blogs. Other than this, I give presentations in Docker meetups and other meetups in Bangalore. The best part about being a Docker captain is the direct access to Docker developers and other Docker captains and there is always something new to learn from them.

How did you first get involved with Docker?

I was fascinated with cloud adoption and trying out related technologies like AWS and Google cloud, Openstack and SDN. I dabbled into Docker as part of this. I was initially impressed with how fast I could build, deploy and destroy a Docker container. I got involved in Docker from October 2014 and the first version I used was Docker 1.3.

Why do you like Docker?

There are many reasons, the biggest reason is perhaps the simplicity. There has been a lot of effort put in making complex topics like Orchestration and Security very easy to use for both developers and operations teams.

What’s your favorite thing about the Docker community?

The Docker community is super-active, encourages new members and supports diversity.

Follow all of the Docker Captains on Twitter using Docker with Alex Ellis’ tutorial.

Docker Captains

Captains are Docker ambassadors (not Docker employees) and their genuine love of all things Docker has a huge impact on the Docker community – whether they are blogging, writing books, speaking, running workshops, creating tutorials and classes, offering support in forums, or organizing and contributing to local events – they make Docker’s mission of democratizing technology possible. Whether you are new to Docker or have been a part of the community for a while, please don’t hesitate to reach out to Docker Captains with your challenges, questions, speaking requests and more.

While Docker does not accept applications for the Captains program, we are always on the lookout to add additional leaders that inspire and educate the Docker community. If you are interested in becoming a Docker Captain, we need to know how you are giving back. Sign up for community.docker.com, share your activities on social media with the #Docker, get involved in a local meetup as a speaker or organizer and continue to share your knowledge of Docker in your community.


 

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Jenny Burcio

5 Minutes with the Docker Captains


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