Jérôme Petazzoni

Docker + Golang = <3

This is a short collection of tips and tricks showing how Docker can be useful when working with Go code. For instance, I’ll show you how to compile Go code with different versions of the Go toolchain, how to cross-compile to a different platform (and test the result!), or how to produce really small container images. The following article assumes that you have Docker installed on your system. It doesn’t have to be a recent version (we’re not going to use any fancy feature here). Go without go … And by that, we mean “Go without installing go”. If you write Go code, or if you have even the slightest interest into the Go language, you certainly have the Go compiler and toolchain installed, so you might be wondering “what’s the point?”; but there are a few scenarios where you Continue reading…

How I Started Contributing to the Docker Project

written by Antonio Murdaca, (@runc0m) I’ve always struggled with finding the free time to give back some of what I take from open source on a daily basis. This is by far the most obvious reason people find it difficult to start their open source “career” and turn contributing into a regular hobby. Unless you’re being paid for it, the time you spend contributing to open source is time you could have spent having a beer with friends. And many times, discussions with colleagues about doing feature “X” for open source project “Y” ends with someone saying, “Who cares if I fix a typo or refactor something?”. You might not find the time to contribute because you actually don’t care, you feel your contributions aren’t valuable, or you simply prefer to do other things. But as a user of open Continue reading…

Docker’s 2nd Birthday, By the Numbers

Back in March, we invited you to be a part of Docker’s first-ever open-source-a-thon to celebrate the project’s 2nd birthday and work towards a good cause. Now that over a month of events and online contributions have come to a close, we wanted to show off all the hard work our community has put in, and the amazing feat they’ve accomplished. Over 1,200 people attended birthday events across the world, between 17 open-source-a-thons organized by Docker and 7 run completely by community members. Participants learned Go, mentored beginner contributors, made their first open source pull requests, updated docs, wrote blog posts, and much, much more. It’s been pretty crazy.

Highlights from the Docker Project’s first open-source-a-thon

Today we are nearing the end of the Docker Open-Source-a-Thon that kicked off with the Docker birthday party! Here’s an update about the fun times we’ve had so far.

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Docker Project’s 2nd Birthday Party Extensions & Online

We recently announced that we’re organizing a global open-source-a-thon to celebrate the Docker project’s 2nd birthday. Thanks to overwhelming response and support, the event series is expanding to both online and community events! Online From March 23rd through April 19th, any contributions made to the Docker Project will count toward Docker’s donation to the Oceanic Society and its mission to conserve the habitat of Moby Dock and blue whales across the planet. We will be posting a guide on how to participate in this online “open-source-a-thon” on http://docker.party. Like the in-person events, Docker Project team members and expert developers from the broader open source community will teach and guide participants on how to contribute to open source. We’ll also create dedicated online communication channels for people new to contributing to open source and/or new to Docker.

Victor Coisne

Join us for Docker Birthday and Open-Source-a-thon to support whales and marine wildlife

Two weeks ago, we proudly announced the organization of a global open-source-a-thon to celebrate the Docker project’s 2nd birthday. Today, we’re excited to share more details around the event series and how you can participate. During the week of March 23rd, the docker community will be hosting over a dozen open-source-a-thon parties around the world. At these parties the Docker core team and expert developers from the Go community will teach and guide participants on how to contribute to open source. Contributions to the project at these events and in the weeks following will count toward our donation to the Oceanic Society and its mission to conserve the habitat of Moby Dock and blue whales across the planet.

Docker Project Announces Open-Source-a-thon to Support Whale and Marine Wildlife Conservation

Docker Project Announces Open-Source-a-thon to Support Whale and Marine Wildlife Conservation Partnering with Oceanic Society to link open source contributions to driving “blue” conservation SAN FRANCISCO – February 19, 2015 – The Docker Project, the open platform for distributed applications, today announced it will be organizing an open-source-a-thon where Docker core team members will teach and mentor people in how to contribute to open source. Contributions include code, documentation, tutorials, videos, and mentoring. Each contribution to the Docker Project will also support the Oceanic Society and its mission to conserve oceans. The program is timed to coincide with the project’s 2nd birthday and is focused on a cause – ocean and marine life health – that is important to its millions of users. Docker’s logo, Moby Dock, is a blue whale that was contributed and selected by its community.  The Continue reading…

The power of developer communities

Since this is my first post on the Docker blog, I should introduce myself. My name is Steve Francia but you may know me better by spf13 which is my username on Twitter, GitHub and the address to my blog. I’ve recently joined Docker, Inc. as the chief of operations: open source. In this role, I’m incredibly excited to be joining the Docker project as the chief operator to work alongside Solomon Hykes who will continue to focus on driving the vision and strategy of the project in the role of chief architect and Michael Crosby who has just been appointed chief maintainer. My role in the company is to be 100% focused on the Docker project. I’ll be heavily focused on the user and contributor experience and making sure that both experiences are optimized for maximum productivity.