Gareth Rushgrove

Top 5 Blog Post 2018: Simplifying Kubernetes with Docker Compose and Friends

All this week we’ve been bringing you the top 5 blog posts for 2018 –coming in at #1 is our post on open sourcing our Docker Compose on Kubernetes capability. This new capability enables you to simplify the Kubernetes experience. To learn more, continue reading…      Today we’re happy to announce we’re open sourcing our support for using Docker Compose on Kubernetes. We’ve had this capability in Docker Enterprise for a little while but as of today you will be able to use this on any Kubernetes cluster you choose. Why do I need Compose if I already have Kubernetes? The Kubernetes API is really quite large. There are more than 50 first-class objects in the latest release, from Pods and Deployments to ValidatingWebhookConfiguration and ResourceQuota. This can lead to a verbosity in configuration, which then needs to be managed by Continue reading…

Patrick Chanezon

Announcing Cloud Native Application Bundle (CNAB)

As more organizations pursue cloud-native applications and infrastructures for creating modern software environments, it has become clear that there is no single solution in the market for defining and packaging these multi-service, multi-format distributed applications. Real-world applications can now span on-premises infrastructure and cloud-based services, requiring multiple tools like Terraform for the infrastructure, Helm charts and Docker Compose files for the applications, and CloudFormation or ARM templates for the cloud-services. Each of these need to be managed separately.     To address this problem, Microsoft in collaboration with Docker are announcing Cloud Native Application Bundle (CNAB) – an open source, cloud-agnostic specification for packaging and running distributed applications. CNAB unifies the management of multi-service, distributed applications across different toolchains into a single all-in-one packaging format.The CNAB specification lets you define resources that can be deployed to any combination of runtime Continue reading…

Gareth Rushgrove

Simplifying Kubernetes with Docker Compose and Friends

Today we’re happy to announce we’re open sourcing our support for using Docker Compose on Kubernetes. We’ve had this capability in Docker Enterprise for a little while but as of today you will be able to use this on any Kubernetes cluster you choose. Why do I need Compose if I already have Kubernetes? The Kubernetes API is really quite large. There are more than 50 first-class objects in the latest release, from Pods and Deployments to ValidatingWebhookConfiguration and ResourceQuota. This can lead to a verbosity in configuration, which then needs to be managed by you, the developer. Let’s look at a concrete example of that. The Sock Shop is the canonical example of a microservices application. It consists of multiple services using different technologies and backends, all packaged up as Docker images. It also provides example configurations using different tools, including both Continue reading…

Gareth Rushgrove

Making Compose Easier to Use with Application Packages

Docker Compose is wildly popular with developers for describing an application. In fact, there are more than 300,000 Docker Compose files on GitHub. With a set of services described in a docker-compose.yml file, it’s easy to launch a complex multi-service application (or a simple, single-service app) on Docker by running a single command. This ease of use makes Docker Compose perfect for development teams striving for a quick way of getting started with projects. Over time Compose has evolved, adding lots of features which help when deploying those same applications to production environments, for example specifying a number of replicas, memory resource constraints or a custom syslog server. But those attributes can become specific to your own environment. There are a number of different strategies for trying to address this situation, but the most common is relying on copy and paste. It’s Continue reading…

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Mike Coleman

Docker Compose and Kubernetes with Docker for Desktop

With KubeCon EU happening in Copenhagen, we looked back at the most popular posts with our readers on Docker and Kubernetes. For those of you that have yet to try Docker EE 2.0, this blog highlights how in Docker for Desktops you can use Docker compose to directly deploy an application onto a Kubernetes cluster.  If you’re running an edge version of Docker on your desktop (Docker for Mac or Docker for Windows Desktop), you can now stand up a single-node Kubernetes cluster with the click of a button. While I’m not a developer, I think this is great news for the millions of developers who have already been using Docker on their Macbook or Windows laptop because they now have a fully compliant Kubernetes cluster at their fingertips without installing any other tools. Developers using Docker to build containerized applications often Continue reading…

Banjot Chanana

Extending Docker Enterprise Edition to Support Kubernetes

At DockerCon Europe, we announced that Docker will be delivering seamless integration of Kubernetes into the Docker platform. Bringing Kubernetes to Docker Enterprise Edition (EE) will simplify and advance the management of Kubernetes for enterprise IT and deliver the advanced capabilities of Docker EE to a broader set of applications. Swarm and Kubernetes Side-by-Side Docker EE is an enterprise-grade container platform that includes a private image registry, advanced security features and centralized management for the entire container lifecycle. By including Kubernetes for container orchestration, customers will have the ability to run both Swarm and Kubernetes in the same Docker EE cluster while still leveraging the same secure software supply chain for building and deploying applications. Figure 1. Docker EE Architecture with Multiple Orchestrators This is possible because Docker EE has a modular architecture that is designed to support multiple orchestrators. The Linux nodes are both Continue reading…

Sophia Parafina

Spring Boot Development with Docker

The AtSea Shop is an example storefront application that can be deployed on different operating systems and can be customized to both your enterprise development and operational environments. In my last post, I discussed the architecture of the app. In this post, I will cover how to setup your development environment to debug the Java REST backend that runs in a container. Building the REST Application I used the Spring Boot framework to rapidly develop the REST backend that manages products, customers and orders tables used in the AtSea Shop. The application takes advantage of Spring Boot’s built-in application server, support for REST interfaces and ability to define multiple data sources. Because it was written in Java, it is agnostic to the base operating system and runs in either Windows or Linux containers. This allows developers to build against a heterogenous architecture. Project setup The AtSea project Continue reading…

Mano Marks

Voting with Docker: A little break from the election

You may have heard, there’s an election for president (and many other posts) going on in the US today. For those who already voted, who want a break from voting, or just want to create a new quiz for their friends, we have the Docker Example Voting App. And we’ve even created a poll to help you figure out the best quiz to make. Which #Docker voting app face off would you select? #TwitterPoll #ElectionDay — Docker (@docker) November 8, 2016 The voting app was created to showcase a number of features of Docker: Polyglot development environments: The app has Python, Node.js, and .NET code, as well as Redis and Postgres services. Easy deployment of a multi-service app with Docker Compose. Easy Docker Networking. All this using a simple $ docker-compose up. The Example Voting App has been really popular at Continue reading…