Nicola Kabar

Scalable, Flexible Networking Included in Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0

    Docker believes in making technology easy to use and accessible and that approach also extends to our enterprise-ready container platform. That means providing out-of-the-box integrations to key extensions of the platform that enterprise organizations require, but also making it possible to swap these built-in solutions with other tools as desired. Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0, integrates Kubernetes to our platform and delivers the only Kubernetes platform that can be deployed across multiple clouds and multiple operating systems. As part of this release, we have included Project Calico by Tigera as the “batteries included” Kubernetes CNI plug-in for a highly scalable, industry-leading networking and routing solution. Why Project Calico? While we support our customers using their preferred CNI plug-in, we chose to integrate Project Calico for our built-in solution because it aligns well with our design objectives for Docker EE Continue reading…

Brett Inman

Running Docker on Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0

Did you know that Docker Hub has millions of users pulling roughly one billion container images every two weeks — and it all runs on Docker Enterprise Edition? Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0 may now be available to commercial customers who require an enterprise-ready container platform, but the Docker operations team has already been using it in production for some time. As part of our commitment to delivering high quality software that is ready to support your mission-critical applications, we leverage Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0 as the platform behind Docker Hub and our other SaaS services, Docker Store, and Docker Cloud. Some organizations call it “dogfooding;” some call it “drinking your own champagne.” Whatever you call it, the importance of this program is to be fully invested in our own container platform and share in the same operational experiences as our Continue reading…

Vivek Saraswat

Announcing Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0

  We are excited to announce Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0 – a significant leap forward in our enterprise-ready container platform. Docker Enterprise Edition (EE) 2.0 is the only platform that manages and secures applications on Kubernetes in multi-Linux, multi-OS and multi-cloud customer environments. As a complete platform that integrates and scales with your organization, Docker EE 2.0 gives you the most flexibility and choice over the types of applications supported, orchestrators used, and where it’s deployed. It also enables organizations to operationalize Kubernetes more rapidly with streamlined workflows and helps you deliver safer applications through integrated security solutions. In this blog post, we’ll walk through some of the key new capabilities of Docker EE 2.0. Eliminate Your Fear of Lock-in As containerization becomes core to your IT strategy, the importance of having a platform that supports choice becomes even more Continue reading…

Carl Fischer

Docker for Windows Desktop 18.02 with Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

The headline feature in Docker for Windows Desktop 18.02 is the option for an automated Kubernetes cluster, enabling native support of your favorite Kubernetes tools with Linux containers on your Windows desktop. That’s a big deal. You can try it out by using the whale icon in the system tray to set Docker for Windows Desktop into Linux containers mode, and then enabling Kubernetes support via the Settings menu. If you use current Windows 10 Insider builds please be aware of a Windows platform issue that affects Linux containers in Docker for Windows Desktop. But that’s not all. This post covers additional progress on experimental support for Microsoft’s Linux containers on Windows (LCOW). Docker for Windows 18.02 now supports Linux and Windows containers running side-by-side via LCOW, using a single Docker daemon. More on the evolution of LCOW: Docker for Windows 17.11 with Windows Continue reading…

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Vivek Saraswat

Beta for Docker Enterprise Edition with Kubernetes Integration Now Available

Today we are excited to launch the public beta for Docker Enterprise Edition (Docker EE), our container management platform. First announced at DockerCon Europe, this release features Kubernetes integration as an optional orchestration solution, running side-by-side with Docker Swarm. With this solution, organizations will be able to deploy applications with either Swarm or fully-conformant Kubernetes while maintaining the consistent developer-to-IT workflow users have come to expect from Docker, especially when combined with the recent edge release of Docker for Mac with Kubernetes support. In addition to Kubernetes, this release includes enhancements to Swarm and to Docker Trusted Registry (DTR) which can be tested during the beta period. Due to the high interest in this beta, license keys will be rolled out in batches over the next few weeks. Individuals who signed up for beta at www.docker.com/kubernetes will receive instructions on how to access this release and Continue reading…

Jim Armstrong

Docker for Mac with Kubernetes

  You heard about it at DockerCon Europe and now it is here: we are proud to announce that Docker for Mac with beta Kubernetes support is now publicly available as part of the Edge release channel. We hope you are as excited as we are! With this release you can now run a single node Kubernetes cluster right on your Mac and use both kubectl commands and docker commands to control your containers. First, a few things to keep in mind: Docker for Mac required Kubernetes features are only accessible on macOS for now; Docker for Windows and Docker Enterprise Edition betas will follow at a later date. If you need to install a new copy of Docker for Mac you can download it from the Docker Store. Edge channel required Kubernetes support is still considered experimental with this release, so to enable the Continue reading…

Justin Cormack

Top 5 blogs of 2017: LinuxKit, A Toolkit for building Secure, Lean and Portable Linux Subsystems

In case you’ve missed it, this week we’re highlighting the top five most popular Docker blogs in 2017. Coming in the third place is the announcement of LinuxKit, a toolkit for building secure, lean and portable Linux Subsystems.   LinuxKit includes the tooling to allow building custom Linux subsystems that only include exactly the components the runtime platform requires. All system services are containers that can be replaced, and everything that is not required can be removed. All components can be substituted with ones that match specific needs. It is a kit, very much in the Docker philosophy of batteries included but swappable. LinuxKit is an open source project available at https://github.com/linuxkit/linuxkit. To achieve our goals of a secure, lean and portable OS,we built it from containers, for containers.  Security is a top-level objective and aligns with NIST stating, in their Continue reading…

Banjot Chanana

Simplifying the Management of Kubernetes with Docker Enterprise Edition

Back in October at DockerCon Europe, we announced that Docker will be delivering a  seamless and simplified integration of Kubernetes into the Docker platform. By integrating Kubernetes with Docker EE, we provide the choice to use Kubernetes and/or Docker Swarm for orchestration while maintaining the consistent developer to operator workflow users have come to expect from Docker. For users, this means they get an unmodified, conformant version of Kubernetes with the added value of the Docker platform including security, management, a familiar developer workflow and tooling, broad ecosystem compatibility and an adherence to industry standards including containerd and the OCI. One of the biggest questions that we’ve been asked since we announced support for Kubernetes at  DockerCon EU –  what does this mean for an operations team that is already using Kubernetes to orchestrate containers within their enterprise? The answer is really Continue reading…