Solomon Hykes

Welcoming the Orchard and Fig team

Today I am extremely proud to announce that the creators of Orchard and Fig – two of the most polished and exciting projects to come out of the Docker ecosystem – are joining the Docker team. Fig is by far the easiest way to orchestrate the deployment of multi-container applications, and has been called “the perfect Docker companion for developers”. As it turns out, these are currently the two most important questions for the tens of thousands of people building applications on the Docker platform: How to orchestrate Docker containers in a standard way? How to make Docker awesome for developers? With Fig, Ben and Aanand got closer to an answer than anybody else in the ecosystem. They have a natural instinct for building awesome developer tools, with just the right blend of simplicity and flexibility. They understand the value Continue reading…

Solomon Hykes

Docker 0.10: quality and ops tooling

Today we are happy to introduce Docker 0.10. We hope you will like it! We’d like to thank all the awesome community folks who contributed to this release: Tianon Gravi, Alexander Larsson, Vincent Batts, Dan Walsh, Andy Kipp, Ken Ichikawa, Alexandr Morozov, Kato Kazuyoshi, Timothy Hobbs, Brian Goff, Daniel Norberg, Brandon Philips, Scott Collier, Fabio Falci Rodrigues, Liang-Chi Hsieh, Sridhar Ratnakumar, Johan Euphrosine, Paul Nasrat and all the awesome folks at Docker. This release is the next step on the road to Docker 1.0. The changelog is particularly large, with a dominant focus on quality and improving ops tooling. Quality Firstly, we’ve continued our focus on quality as we near 1.0. This release includes the results of a week-long sprint where we fixed bugs, improved testing and documentation, cleaned up UI glitches, and so on. In that week alone we closed Continue reading…

Solomon Hykes

Docker 0.9: introducing execution drivers and libcontainer

Fellow Dockers, Today we are happy to introduce Docker 0.9. With this release we are continuing our focus on quality over features, shrinking and stabilizing the core, and providing first-class support for all major operating systems. In addition to dozen of bug fixes, Docker 0.9 includes 2 major improvements: execution drivers and libcontainer. As usual, for a complete list of improvements, you can check out the Changelog.   Execution drivers First, we are introducing an execution driver API which can be used to customize the execution environment surrounding each container. This allows Docker to take advantage of the numerous isolation tools available, each with their particular tradeoffs and install base: OpenVZ, systemd-nspawn, libvirt-lxc, libvirt-sandbox, qemu/kvm, BSD Jails, Solaris Zones, and even good old chroot. This is in addition to LXC, which will continue to be available as a driver of Continue reading…

Solomon Hykes

Docker 0.8: Quality, new builder features, btrfs, OSX support

Fellow Dockers, Today we are happy to introduce Docker 0.8, with a focus on Quality and 3 notable features: new builder instructions, a new BTRFS storage driver, and official support for Mac OSX. You can see the full Changelog on the repository, and read below for details on each feature. This release is special in several ways: First, this is the first Docker release where features take the backseat to quality: dozens and dozens of bugfixes, performance boosts, stability improvements, code cleanups, extra documentation and improved code coverage – that’s the primary feature in Docker 0.8. We still have ways to go, and there are still many open bugs! But we are making progress and will continue to focus on Quality until it becomes a defining characteristic of Docker. Second, this release marks the beginning of a new release cadence, which Continue reading…

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Solomon Hykes

Docker 0.7 runs on all Linux distributions – and 6 other major features

So, Docker 0.7 is finally here! We hope you’ll like it. On top of countless bug fixes and small usability improvements, it introduces 7 major features since 0.6.0: Feature 1: Standard Linux support Feature 2: Storage drivers Feature 3: Offline transfer Feature 4: Links Feature 5: Container naming Feature 6: Advanced port redirects Feature 7: Quality You can see the full Changelog on the repository, and read below for details on each feature.

Solomon Hykes

Announcing Docker 0.6

Events API, build and registry improvements, expert mode, security updates, and more. Notice: If you are currently using the Ubuntu PPA to install docker you will need to modify your APT sources in order to upgrade to docker 0.6.0.  Please visit http://docs.docker.io/en/latest/installation/ubuntulinux/  for the new repository information. Dear Dockers, Wow, we have quite a release for you today. Since the last release just one month ago, the project has received 378 commits by 40 different contributors! In addition to boatloads of usability improvements and bugfixes, 0.6 introduces a websockets events api, upgrades to the Dockerfile syntax, a major improvement of the registry download and upload protocol, tighter security and access control, an “expert mode” for advanced usage scenarios, and much more. You can see the full changelog here. We hope you like it. Solomon & the Docker team

Solomon Hykes

Docker 0.5.0: external volumes, advanced networking, self hosted registry

Introducing Docker 0.5.0 Dear Dockers, Today we are happy to introduce a new release of Docker. In addition to numerous stability and usability fixes, this release adds support for external volumes, advanced networking options, a vastly improved self-hosted registry, and dozens of other improvements.

Solomon Hykes

dotCloud and Docker join the Linux Foundation

We are very excited to announce that dotCloud has joined the Linux Foundation. The Linux Foundation is a nonprofit consortium dedicated to fostering the growth of Linux and collaborative software development. Docker obviously depends on a number of technologies developed by the members of the Linux community—including LinuX Containers (LXC), cgroups, and the kernel itself. Ultimately, our goal is to build the “button” that enables any code to instantly and consistently run on any server anywhere. Achieving that goal is dependent not only on having a thriving open source community for Docker, but also by the continued success and spread of both Linux and collaborative software development in general. In less than four months since Docker launched, we’ve been thrilled to see Docker integrations into open source projects such as OpenStack, Chef, Puppet, Vagrant, and mcollective, as well as the Continue reading…