Gareth Rushgrove

Making Compose Easier to Use with Application Packages

Docker Compose is wildly popular with developers for describing an application. In fact, there are more than 300,000 Docker Compose files on GitHub. With a set of services described in a docker-compose.yml file, it’s easy to launch a complex multi-service application (or a simple, single-service app) on Docker by running a single command. This ease of use makes Docker Compose perfect for development teams striving for a quick way of getting started with projects. Over time Compose has evolved, adding lots of features which help when deploying those same applications to production environments, for example specifying a number of replicas, memory resource constraints or a custom syslog server. But those attributes can become specific to your own environment. There are a number of different strategies for trying to address this situation, but the most common is relying on copy and paste. It’s Continue reading…

Gareth Rushgrove

Introducing an Easier Way To Design Applications in Docker Desktop

In today’s DockerCon keynote we previewed an upcoming Docker Desktop feature that will make it easier than ever to design your own container-based applications. For a certain set of developers, the current iteration of Docker Desktop has everything one might need to containerize an applications, but it does require an understanding of the Dockerfile and Compose file specifications in order to get started and the Docker CLI to build and run your applications. But we’ve been thinking about ways to bring this capability to ALL developers. We want to make it easier to get started with containerization, and we want to make it even easier to share and collaborate and integrate container-based development in to more developers’ toolsets. This new guided workflow feature is a preview of what we’re working on and we wanted to share more details on the Continue reading…

Gareth Rushgrove

Docker for Desktop is Certified Kubernetes

“You are now Certified Kubernetes.” With this comment, Docker for Windows and Docker for Mac passed the Kubernetes conformance tests. Kubernetes has been available in Docker for Mac and Docker for Windows since January, having first being announced at DockerCon EU last year. But why is this important to the many of you who are using Docker for Windows and Docker for Mac? Kubernetes is designed to be a platform that others can build upon. As with any similar project, the risk is that different distributions vary enough that applications aren’t really portable. The Kubernetes project has always been aware of that risk – and this led directly to forming the Conformance Working Group. The group owns a test suite that anyone distributing Kubernetes can run, and submit the results for to attain official certification. This test suite checks that Kubernetes behaves Continue reading…