Posts by: Docker Core Engineering

Docker Core Engineering

Today we released Docker CE 17.06  with new features, improvements, and bug fixes. Docker CE 17.06 is the first Docker version built entirely on the Moby Project, which we announced in April at DockerCon. You can see the complete list of changes in the changelog, but let’s take a look at some of the new features. We also created a video version of this post here: Multi-stage builds The biggest feature in 17.06 CE is that multi-stage builds, announced in April at DockerCon, have come to the stable release. Multi-stage builds allow you to build cleaner, smaller Docker images using a single Dockerfile. Multi-stage…

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Docker Core Engineering

Today we’re releasing Docker 1.13 with lots of new features, improvements and fixes to help Docker users with New Year’s resolutions to build more and better container apps. Docker 1.13 builds on and improves Docker swarm mode introduced in Docker 1.12 and has lots of other fixes. Read on for Docker 1.13 highlights. Use compose-files to deploy swarm mode services Docker 1.13 adds Compose-file support to the `docker stack deploy` command so that services can be deployed using a `docker-compose.yml` file directly. Powering this is a major effort to extend the swarm service API to make it more flexible and useful. Benefits include:…

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Docker Core Engineering

Written by Bill Farner and David Chung Docker’s mission is to build tools of mass innovation, starting with a programmable layer for the Internet that enables developers and IT operations teams to build and run distributed applications. As part of this mission, we have always endeavored to contribute software plumbing toolkits back to the community, following the UNIX philosophy of building small loosely coupled tools that are created to simply do one thing well. As Docker adoption has grown from 0 to 6 billion pulls, we have worked to address the needs of a growing and diverse set of distributed…

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Docker Core Engineering

We wanted to thank everyone in the community for helping us achieve this great milestone of making Docker 1.12 generally available for production environments. Docker 1.12 adds the largest and most sophisticated set of features into a single release since the beginning of the Docker project. Dozens of engineers, both Docker employees and external contributors, have made substantial contributions to every aspect of 1.12 orchestration including core algorithms, integration into the Docker Engine, documentation and testing. We’re very grateful to the community, which has helped us with feedback, bug reports and new ideas. We couldn’t have done it without the…

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Docker Core Engineering

Three years ago, Docker made an esoteric Linux kernel technology called containerization simple and accessible to everyone. Today, we are doing the same for container orchestration. Container orchestration is what is needed to transition from deploying containers individually on a single host, to deploying complex multi-container apps on many machines. It requires a distributed platform, independent from infrastructure, that stays online through the entire lifetime of your application, surviving hardware failure and software updates. Orchestration is at the same stage today as containerization was 3 years ago. There are two options: either you need an army of technology experts to cobble together a…

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Docker Core Engineering

We’re pleased to announce Docker 1.10, jam-packed with stuff you’ve been asking for. It’s now much easier to define and run complex distributed apps with Docker Compose. The power that Compose brought to orchestrating containers is now available for setting up networks and volumes. On your development machine, you can set up your app with multiple network tiers and complex storage configurations, replicating how you might set it up in production. You can then take that same configuration from development, and use it to run your app on CI, on staging, and right through into production. Check out the blog…

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