Victor Coisne

Get involved with the Moby Project by attending upcoming Moby Summits!

Last month at DockerCon, we introduced the Moby Project: an open-source project sponsored by Docker to advance the software containerization movement. The idea behind the project is to help the ecosystem take containers mainstream by providing a library of components, a framework for assembling them into custom container-based systems and a place for all container enthusiasts to experiment and exchange ideas. Going forward, Docker will be assembled using Moby, see Moby and Docker or the diagram below for more details. Moby Summit at DockerCon 2017 Knowing that that a good number of maintainers, contributors and advanced Docker users would be attending DockerCon, we decided to organize the first Moby Summit in collaboration with the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). The summit was a small collaborative event for container hackers who are actively maintaining, contributing or generally involved or interested in the design and Continue reading…

Justin Cormack

Announcing LinuxKit: A Toolkit for building Secure, Lean and Portable Linux Subsystems

  Last year, one of the most common requests we heard from our users was to bring a Docker-native experience to their platforms. These platforms were many and varied: from cloud platforms such as AWS, Azure, Google Cloud, to server platforms such as Windows Server, desktop platforms that their developers used such as OSX and Windows 10, to mainframes and IoT platforms –  the list went on. We started working on support for these platforms, and we initially shipped Docker for Mac and Docker for Windows, followed by Docker for AWS and Docker for Azure. Most recently, we announced the beta of Docker for GCP. The customizations we applied to make Docker native for each platform have furthered the adoption of the Docker editions. One of the issues we encountered was that for many of these platforms, the users wanted Linuxcontainer Continue reading…

Patrick Chanezon

containerd joins the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Today, we’re excited to announce that containerd – Docker’s core container runtime – has been accepted by the Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) as an incubating project in the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). containerd’s acceptance into the CNCF alongside projects such as Kubernetes, gRPC and Prometheus comes three months after Docker, with support from the five largest cloud providers, announced its intent to contribute the project to a neutral foundation in the first quarter of this year. In the process of spinning containerd out of Docker and contributing it to CNCF there are a few changes that come along with it.  For starters, containerd now has a logo; see below. In addition, we have a new @containerd twitter handle. In the next few days, we’ll be moving the containerd GitHub repository to a separate GitHub organization. Similarly, the containerd slack channel will be moved to separate slack team which will soon available at containerd.slack.com containerd has Continue reading…

Solomon Hykes

Docker to donate containerd to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Today, Docker announced its intention to donate the containerd project to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Back in December 2016, Docker spun out its core container runtime functionality into a standalone component, incorporating it into a separate project called containerd, and announced we would be donating it to a neutral foundation early this year. Today we took a major step forward towards delivering on our commitment to the community by following the Cloud Native Computing Foundation process and presenting a proposal to the CNCF Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) for containerd to become a CNCF project. Given the consensus we have been building with the community, we are hopeful to get a positive affirmation from the TOC before CloudNativeCon/KubeCon later this month.   Over the past 4 years, the adoption of containers with Docker has triggered an unprecedented wave of innovation in our industry: Continue reading…

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Michael Crosby

containerd summit recap: slides, videos and meeting notes

Last week, we hosted a containerd summit for contributors and maintainers. Containerd is a core container runtime with an emphasis on simplicity, robustness and portability. It is available as a daemon for Linux and Windows, which can manage the complete container lifecycle of its host system: image transfer and storage, container execution and supervision, snapshot storage for container filesystems and a few other things to make the management of containers robust. We started off by getting everyone up to speed on the project, roadmap and goals before diving down into specific issues and design of containerd.  We had a couple breakout sessions where we discussed blocking issues and feature requests by various members of the community. You can see a summary of the breakout sessions in last week’s development report in the containerd repository and the various presentations below: Deep Dive into Continue reading…

Victor Coisne

containerd livestream recap

In case you missed it last month, we announced that Docker is extracting a key component of its container platform, a part of the engine plumbing called containerd – a core container runtime – and committed to donating it to an open foundation. You can find up-to-date roadmap, architecture and API definitions in the Github repository, and more details about the project in our engineering team’s blog post. You can also watch the following video recording of the containerd online meetup, for a summary and Q&A with Arnaud Porterie, Michael Crosby, Stephen Day, Patrick Chanezon and Solomon Hykes from the Docker team: Here is the list of top questions we got following this announcement: Q. Are you planning to run docker without runC ? A. Although runC is the default runtime, as of  Docker 1.12, it can be replaced by any other OCI-compliant implementation. Docker will be Continue reading…

Patrick Chanezon

More details about containerd, Docker’s core container runtime component

Today we announced that Docker is extracting a key component of its container platform, a part of the engine plumbing–containerd a core container runtime–and commits to donating it to an open foundation. containerd is designed to be less coupled, and easier to integrate with other tools sets. And it is being written and designed to address the requirements of the major cloud providers and container orchestration systems. Because we know a lot of Docker fans want to know how the internals work, we thought we would share the current state of containerd and what we plan for version 1.0. Before that, it’s a good idea to look at what Docker has become over the last three and a half years. The Docker platform isn’t a container runtime. It is in fact a set of integrated tools that allow you to build Continue reading…

Solomon Hykes

containerd – a core container runtime project for the industry

Today Docker is spinning out its core container runtime functionality into a standalone component, incorporating it into a separate project called containerd, and will be donating it to a neutral foundation early next year. This is the latest chapter in a multi-year effort to break up the Docker platform into a more modular architecture of loosely coupled components. Over the past 3 years, as Docker adoption skyrocketed, it grew into a complete platform to build, ship and run distributed applications, covering many functional areas from infrastructure to orchestration, the core container runtime being just a piece of it. For millions of developers and IT pros, a complete platform is exactly what they need. But many platform builders and operators are looking for “boring infrastructure”: a basic component that provides the robust primitives for running containers on their system, bundled in Continue reading…